Europe’s largest wooden rollercoaster opens in Ireland

June 12, 2015

Europe’s largest wooden rollercoaster opens in Ireland



Ireland has some of the most productive forests in Europe with a strong export market. Landowners are likely to consider renewable biomass energy, pallets, sawdust and bark as typical wood products that offer a stable income. Recently, a more innovative use for wood was unveiled in Ireland – Europe’s largest Wooden Rollercoaster and the first with an Inversion.

Part of  Tayto Park in Co Meath, the Cú Chulainn Coaster is made from 800,000 kilos of yellow pine wood, 100 tonnes of steel, and 700,000 nails and bolts.  A team of 70 engineers began work on the attraction in September 2014, which accommodates over 1,000 people per hour. Reaching speeds of up 100km an hour, the Cú Chulainn is 32m tall and 1,000m in length.

As a strong, cheap and durable construction resource, wooden structures can enhance the surrounding environment. Building with wood is also sustainable, as forestry resources can be replenished over time. Iconic wooden buildings throughout the world include the Kizhi Pogost church (Russia), Metropol Parasol (Spain) and the Horyuj temple (Japan).